About

Circuit Portraits

This project highlights the individuality that the people that made these artefacts bring to their work. The circuits I have chosen to feature are ones that have significance to me, either because our family had one, I had good memories of using them at friends houses, or because I coveted them badly.

They are curated from a golden era when consumer electronics still used relatively discrete components and the circuits themselves were open and simple. The days before computer-driven auto-routing could algorithmically calculate the most efficient routing scheme, with the fewest vias and the lowest impedance, in fact, the days when circuits were laid out on light-tables with gridding tape and set-squares. The days of Frogger and Pacman, of Horace Goes Ski-ing and Jetpac.

Engineers had their job to do, but for each design, had to choose only one of a thousand different ways to lay out their tracks. Each line was pored over for it’s technical correctness, but ultimately there’s a little bit of expression in each mark and swerve, in each routing decision.

None of it was ever intended to be looked at, but nevertheless, stripped of it’s contextual markers – the case, buttons, lights, labels, connectors, components, and presented out-of-scale and on beautiful paper, under glass, the patterns reveal their purely aesthetic features and invite interpretation. A variation in density and detail play out a rhythm, and indicate a direction, movement.

Circuit boards, even now, are still produced industrially using a silkscreen technique, so the artist’s variation of this technique is very apt.

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I’m based in Edinburgh, Scotland and have a studio at St Margaret’s House, where I do my printing.

Twits: @uptomuch

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